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PARKINSON'S DISEASE NEWS

 

 

 

 

 

 

DECEMBER 2016

 

31st December 2016 - New resrearch

DOUBLED RISK OF BRAIN TUMOR IN PARKINSON'S DISEASE

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In Parkinson's Disease there is a decreased risk of cancer, except for melanoma. This study specifically evaluated the risk of brain tumor in Parkinson's Disease. A brain tumour is a growth of cells that multiplies in an uncontrollable way. It can be cancerous (malignant) or non-cancerous (benign). The symptoms can include : severe headaches, seizures, nausea, vomiting and drowsiness, mental or behavioural changes, progressive weakness on one side of the body, vision or speech problems. For more information go to : Brain tumor

This extensive study involved nearly 3000 people with Parkinson's Disease. The risk of developing a brain tumor was found to be significantly higher in people with Parkinson's Disease. The risk of developing a brain tumor was more than doubled. Benign brain tumor exhibited a slightly higher risk. The risk developing a benign brain tumor was even higher in females. An analysis of the age groups found that mostly only those between 50 and 64 years old had a higher risk of developing a brain tumor.

The researchers concluded that people with Parkinson's Disease are at a higher risk of developing a brain tumor but that the exact underlying causes require further investigation.

Reference : Acta Neurologica Scandinavia [2016] 134 (2) : 148-153 (C.F.Tang, M.K.Lu, C.H.Muo, C.H.Tsai, C.H.Kao) Complete abstract  In order to refer to this article on its own click here

 

30th December 2016 - New research

OPICAPONE CLINICAL TRIAL RESULTS FOR PARKINSON'S DISEASE

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Catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT) inhibitors are used for end-of-dose motor fluctuations associated with L-dopa therapy in people with Parkinson's Disease. Current COMT inhibitors can cause adverse effects or show moderate improvement. Opicapone, which is intended to overcome these problems, has recently been authorised for sale as Ongentys by the European Commission. For more information go to : Ongentys

The efficacy and safety of opicapone was evaluated when taking daily dosages of 25mg and 50-mg when added to the existing use of L-dopa in people with Parkinson's Disease.

Treatment with a daily 50mg dose of opicapone was associated with a significant reduction in mean daily off-time in people with Parkinson's Disease who were taking L-dopa. The change in off time was a reduction of 64 minutes for those taking a placebo, 101 minutes for those taking 25mg opicapone, and 118 minutes for those people taking 50mg opicapone. The off-time reduction was sustained throughout the study period.

The most common adverse events in those people taking opicapone were dyskinesia, constipation, and dry mouth. Nearly 12% of patients discontinued the study.

Reference : JAMA Neurology [2016] Dec 27 [Epub ahead of print] (A.J.Lees, J.Ferreira, O.Rascol, W.Poewe, J.F.Rocha, M.McCrory, P.Soares-da-Silva) Complete abstract  In order to refer to this article on its own click here

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