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AUGUST 2011

                                                                                                                                                 

25th August 2011 - New research

DOPAMINE AGONISTS INCREASE THE RISK OF VALVULAR REGURGITATION

Movement Disorders [2011] 26 (5) : 801-806 (V.G.Rasmussen, K.Østergaard, E.Dupont, S.H.PoulsenComplete abstract

The use of dopamine agonists increases the risk of valvular regurgitation in people with Parkinson's Disease. Valvular regurgitation is when a cardiac valve becomes diseased or damaged, and is no longer able to close properly. Leakage of blood occurs across the valve.  This leakage of blood is referred to as regurgitation.  Valvular regurgitation can lead to abnormal cardiac function. For more information go to Mitral valvular regurgitation.

Cabergoline, which is also known by the brand names Dostinex and Cabaser, was the worst of those dopamine agonists assessed. The likelihood of valvular regurgitation in people with Parkinson's Disease taking Cabergoline was more than six times greater than would otherwise be expected. For a full review of Cabergoline go to the Review of Cabergoline. The dopamine agonist Pergolide, which is also known as Permax, makes valvular regurgitation in people with Parkinson's Disease more than three times more likely. The likelihood of Permax causing valvular regurgitation led to its withdrawal in the U.S. in 2007, but it is still used elsewhere. Other dopamine agonists were not assessed. So it is not known to what extent they are harmful in this respect or if they are harmful at all. In order to refer to this article on its own click here.

 

9th August 2011 - New research

THE LONG TERM EFFECTS OF DBS ON PARKINSON'S DISEASE

Archives of Neurology [2011] Published online August 8                                                                                              (A.Castrioto, A.M.Lozano, Yu-Yan Poon, A.E.Lang, M.Fallis, E.Moro Complete abstract

Researchers assessed the outcome of Deep Brain Stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) in people with Parkinson's Disease over a period of 10 years. Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) involves the use of electrodes that are implanted into the brain and connected to a small electrical device called a pulse generator that can be externally programmed. DBS requires careful programming of the stimulator device in order to work correctly. For more information go to Deep brain stimulation.

DBS improved the Parkinson's Disease symptom score by 25% in comparison to no treatment, including resting and action tremor by over 85%, and bradykinesia by 23%. It did not stop deterioration in speech, walking, and postural instability, including falling and freezing. L-dopa dosages reduced to about 63% of what they were initially. Daily living activity also improved. Dyskinesia and motor fluctuation scores also remained significantly lower. Potential adverse events included : a trend to weight loss, visual hallucinations, impulse control disorders possibly related to dopamine agonists, progressive cognitive decline culminating in dementia,  device related infections. In order to refer to this article on its own click here.

 

3rd August 2011 - New book

IMAGING IN PARKINSON'S DISEASE

David Eidelberg

Publisher's description : Imaging in Parkinson's Disease provides up-to-date information concerning new applications of brain imaging to the study of Parkinson's Disease. Written by experts in the field, the book focuses on structural and functional imaging methods that have recently been applied to study Parkinson's Disease, with emphasis on the development of the major motor manifestations of the illness as well as cognitive impairment and dementia. Individual chapters address the role of imaging in differential diagnosis and the evaluation of treatment effects. Covering a wide range of subjects and being beautifully illustrated, it is a valuable reference for neurologists, neurosurgeons, neuropsychologists, and for biomedical students. Click here for more details. For more books concerning Parkinson's Disease go to Parkinson's Disease Books. In order to refer to this article on its own click here.

 

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