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MAY 2016

 

31st May 2016 - New book

PARKINSON DISEASE

NetCE, Mark Rose

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Publisher's description : The purpose of this course is to provide needed information about the assessment and treatment of Parkinson disease so healthcare professionals may implement the necessary interventions appropriately. In addition, members of the public may use this course to enhance their personal knowledge of the subject matter presented. This book emphasizes treatment options for Parkinson's disease, critically assessing pharmacologic and surgical interventions for all aspects of the disease. Evidence from randomized controlled clinical trials is highlighted to develop practical recommendations for clinical practice.

The chapters are authored by an international team of specialists in each subject.  Click here for more details For more books concerning Parkinson's Disease go to Parkinson's Disease books  

 

24th May 2016 - New research

THE INCIDENCE OF PARKINSON'S DISEASE IS FALLING

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Instead of Parkinson's Disease becoming progressively more common as was assumed, the incidence of Parkinson's Disease, which is the rate at which people are newly diagnosed, has been found to be continuously declining.

The incidence of Parkinson's disease and Parkinsonism were assessed by comparing data from 1990 until 2010, at 1990, 2000 and 2010. All factors were accounted for. The incidence of Parkinson's Disease in 2000 was found to be only 55% of what it was in 1990. The incidence of Parkinson's Disease in 2010 was found to be only 39% of what it was in 1990. The findings showed that the incidence of Parkinsonism in general, and of Parkinson's Disease in particular, decreased substantially between 1990 and 2011, and is continuously declining.

These findings can not indicate that the methods of treating Parkinson's Disease and Parkinsonism have improved because there was already a substantial decline at the point of diagnosis.

Reference : American Journal of Epidemiology [2016] Apr 29 [Epub ahead of print] (S.K. Darweesh, P.J. Koudstaal, B.H.Stricker, A.Hofman, M.A.Ikram)  Complete abstract In order to refer to this article on its own click here

 

19th May 2016 - New research

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY HALVES THE RISK OF PARKINSON'S DISEASE

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Regular exercise is known to alleviate the muscular symptoms of Parkinson's Disease. However, it remained unclear as to whether a physically active lifestyle could also reduce the risk of Parkinson's Disease. An assessment was made of (1) overall physical activity over 4 age periods, (2) competitive sports, and (3) occupational physical activity.

The risk of Parkinson's Disease was lower when comparing moderate to vigorous activities to low physical activity in the age range 18-24 years, and even moreso in the age range 45-64, but not in the age range 25-44. People who had consistently engaged in overall physical activity at high levels, before they were 65, had only half the risk of developing Parkinson's Disease when compared to those people with low levels of physical activity. Having participated in competitive sports prior to the age of 25 nearly halved the risk of Parkinson's Disease, down to a 53% chance of developing Parkinson's Disease. Occupational physical activity did not lessen the risk at all.

Exercise or activity of the muscles cause a contraction of the muscles used. The after effect of muscle contraction is reduced muscle contraction. Given that the muscular symptoms of Parkinson's Disease are due to excessive muscle contraction, the subsequent reduction of muscles contraction after exercise lessens the muscular symptoms of Parkinson's Disease. Exercise or activity of the muscles do not increase low dopamine levels, which is the primary cause of Parkinson's Disease.

Reference : Parkinsonism and Related Disorders [2016] May 3 [Epub ahead of print] (I.F. Shih, Z.Liew, N.Krause, B.Ritz)  Complete abstract In order to refer to this article on its own click here

 

6th May 2016 - New research

BRADYPHRENIA IN PARKINSON'S DISEASE

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Bradyphrenia is mental slowness. Bradyphrenia can consist of slowness of thought, impaired attention and motivation, lack of spontaneity, and inflexibility. Bradyphrenia was well known to occur in Parkinson's Disease. For the first time researchers have assessed how prevalent bradyphrenia is in Parkinson's Disease and what causes it. 

Bradyphrenia was found to occur in as many as half of people with Parkinson's Disease. Between 11% and 51% of people with Parkinson's Disease were found to exhibit mental slowness by performing significantly worse on neuro- psychological tests including tests of attention and executive function. However, bradyphrenia was found to be uncommon in people with Parkinson's Disease who did not also have dementia or depression. The results suggest that the depression or dementia that often accompanies Parkinson's Disease is the cause of the bradyphrenia.

Bradyphrenia in Parkinson's disease may also reflect advancing age because the effects of age may be greater in some cases than the effects of basal ganglia disease once motor dysfunction has been allowed for. However, he dopamine system through the medial forebrain bundle projecting from the ventral tegmental area to the nucleus accumbens, ventral striatum (limbic striatum) and the cortex is associated with bradyphrenia.

Reference : Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology [2016] May 1 : 1-9 [Epub ahead of print] (T.T.Vlagsma, J.Koerts, O.Tucha, H.T.Dijkstra, A.A.Duits, T.van Laar, J.M.Spikman) Complete abstract In order to refer to this article on its own click here

 

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