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MAY 2015

 

30th May  2015 - New research

CARBON MONOXIDE GREATLY INCREASES THE RISK OF PARKINSON'S DISEASE

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Carbon monoxide poisoning has been found to be able to greatly increase the risk of Parkinson's Disease. Common sources of carbon monoxide include cigarette smoke, gas cookers, gas fires, vehicle exhaust, gasoline-powered tools. For more information go to Carbon monoxide

The overall prevalence of Parkinson's Disease (per 100,000 people per year) in those people that had suffered carbon monoxide intoxication was 27.4. After this figure was adjusted for age, sex, and comorbidities, those people that had carbon monoxide intoxication had nine times the normal risk of developing Parkinson's Disease. This makes it one of the most potent uncommon causes of Parkinson's Disease. Those people with carbon monoxide intoxication who were receiving hyperbaric oxygen therapy, which is used to treat carbon monoxide poisoning had a risk of Parkinson's Disease 14 times above normal. The therapy does not cause Parkinson's Disease but instead shows that it is used in more extreme cases.

The risk of Parkinson's Disease increased a lot in those people suffering carbon monoxide intoxication. The significance was increased in young people. Therefore, in some people, carbon monoxide intoxication can be a serious factor leading to Parkinson's Disease.

Reference : Medicine (Baltimore) [2015] 94 (19) : 1-6 (C.Y. Lai, M.C.Chou, C.L.Lin, C.H.Kao) Complete abstract  In order to refer to this article on its own click here

 

26th May 2015 - New research

SWEDD IN PEOPLE WITH PARKINSON'S DISEASE

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Parkinson's Disease can usually be diagnosed conclusively using scanning methods such as the SPECT scan and the PET scan. The term SWEDD (scans without evidence for dopaminergic deficit) refers somebody initially being assumed to have Parkinson's Disease but whose scan shows the absence of any dopamine deficiency or imaging abnormality that would diagnose them as actually having Parkinson's Disease. For more information go to : SWEDD

While many authors have suggested that medical disorders similar to Parkinson's Disease may account for a proportion of SWEDD cases, others claim that some of them may have a benign subtype of Parkinson's Disease.

There has consequently been some controversy and confusion concerning this term. Researchers systematically reviewed all the studies involving patients with SWEDD with the aim of shedding light on what these patients actually have. After an analysis of all the studies it becomes clear that while most SWEDD cases are due to a clinical misdiagnosis of Parkinson's Disease, there exists a small proportion of patients with SWEDD who may have Parkinson's Disease on the basis of : a positive L-dopa response, clinical progression, imaging and genetic evidence. The latter challenge the seemingly incontrovertible relationship between dopaminergic tracer binding and the diagnosis of Parkinson's Disease.

Reference : Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry [2015] May 19 [Epub ahead of print] (R.Erro, S.A.Schneider, N.P.Quinn, K.P.Bhatia) Complete abstract  In order to refer to this article on its own click here

 

21st May 2015 - New research

THE PLACE OF DEATH IN PARKINSON'S DISEASE

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Most people prefer to receive end-of-life care in familiar surroundings rather than in hospital. This study examined the variation in the place of death for people dying from Parkinson's disease in European and non-European countries. They used death certificates for deaths with Parkinson's Disease as an underlying cause.

The proportion of deaths in hospital ranged from 17% in the USA, which was the lowest, to 75% in South Korea, which was the highest. Hospital was the most prevalent place of death in France (40%), Hungary (60%) and South Korea (75%). Nursing homes were the most prevalent place of death in New Zealand (71%), Belgium (52%), USA (50%), Canada (48%) and Czech Republic (44%). Home was the most prevalent place of death in Mexico (73%), Italy (51%) and Spain (46%). The chances of dying in hospital were consistently higher for men (Belgium, France, Italy, USA, Canada), those younger than 80 years (Belgium, France, Italy, USA, Mexico), and those living in areas with a higher provision of hospital beds (Italy, USA).

In several countries a substantial proportion of deaths from Parkinson's Disease occurs in hospitals, although this may not be the most optimal place of terminal care and death. The wide variation between countries in the proportion of deaths from Parkinson's Disease occurring in hospital indicates a potential for many countries to reduce these proportions.

Reference : BMC Palliative Care [2015] 14 (1) : 28 . [Epub ahead of print] (K.Moens, D.Houttekier, L.Van den Block, R.Harding, L.Morin, S.Marchetti, A.Csikos, M.Loucka, W.A.Naylor, D.M.Wilson, J.Teno, M.Cardenas-Turanzas, Y.Rhee, F.J.Garcia-Leon, L. Deliens, J.Cohen) Complete abstract  In order to refer to this article on its own click here

 

10th May 2015 - New book

PREVENTING PARKINSON'S : HOW TO CUT YOUR RISK BY STRENGTHENING YOUR MULTIPLE S   HOW TO CUT YOUR RISK BY STRENGTHENING YOUR MULTIPLE SHIELDSTIPLE SHIEL

Ben Weinstock

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Publisher's description : Preventing Parkinson's is the only book available that gives readers proactive lifestyle recommendations for optimizing health and lowering the risk of developing Parkinsonís Disease. With over 1,000 references, this extraordinary, groundbreaking work provides cutting-edge, evidence-based research. It is a comprehensive compilation that will benefit both lay people and medical professionals alike. Dr. Weinstock thoroughly evaluates how the synergy of diet, exercise, sleep, stress management, avoidance of toxins, prevention of head injuries, and proper medical care can reduce oneís chance of developing Parkinsonís Disease. Click here for more details For more books concerning Parkinson's Disease go to Parkinson's Disease books In order to refer to this article on its own click here

 

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