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APRIL 2016

 

29th April 2016 - New book

PARKINSON'S DISEASE : CURRENT AND FUTURE THERAPEUTICS AND CLINICAL TRIALS

Nestor Galvez-Jimenez, Hubert H.Fernandez, Alberto J.Espay, Susan H.Fox

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Publisher's description : This book emphasizes treatment options for Parkinson's disease, critically assessing pharmacologic and surgical interventions for all aspects of the disease. Evidence from randomized controlled clinical trials is highlighted to develop practical recommendations for clinical practice. Lessons learnt from clinical trials are all addressed. Readers will find the necessary clinical and scientific foundations for the understanding of the disease, the underpinnings of the pathological processes, the identification of disease biomarkers, and the basis for solid therapeutics. The chapters are authored by an international team of specialists in each subject.  Click here for more details For more books concerning Parkinson's Disease go to Parkinson's Disease books

 

 

25th April 2016 - New research

"EARLY MORNING OFF" IN PARKINSON'S DISEASE

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Early Morning Off (EMO) is a lengthy delay in the therapeutic effect of the initial dose of an oral medication in the morning. Early Morning Off (EMO) is a symptom experienced by people at every stage of Parkinson's Disease. However, few studies have assessed how common it is, leaving the extent of its impact almost completely unknown. For a graph showing the effects of EMO go to :  Early Morning Off

EMO occurs as there is a delay in the effect of the initial dose of oral medication, possibly due to gastroparesis. Gastroparesis is a chronic condition in which the stomach cannot empty itself in the normal way. For more information go to :  Gastroparesis

The analysis assessed the responses from 2205 completed surveys. People with Parkinson's Disease who felt they had EMO amounted to around 80%, with 37% of them stating that EMO was a daily occurrence. The prevalence of EMO increased as Parkinson's Disease worsened. However, even 52% of people with early Parkinson's Disease had EMO. The Quality of Life of those with EMO was also significantly reduced and the odds of caregivers feeling a sense of burden was higher. The prevalence of EMO in the survey results was high, and significantly lowered the persons Quality of Life. EMO was also observed in the early stages of Parkinson's Disease.

Reference : Reference : Journal of Neurological Science [2016] 364 : 1-5 (R.Onozawa, J.Tsugawa, Y.Tsuboi, J.Fukae, T.Mishima, S.Fujioka) Complete abstract In order to refer to this article on its own click here

 

21st April 2016 - New research

ALEXITHYMIA IN PARKINSON'S DISEASE

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Alexithymia has been found to be highly prevalent in Parkinson's Disease to the extent that it is commonly part of it. Alexithymia is a personality trait characterised by difficulties identifying and describing feelings and a reduced tendency to think about emotions.  For more information go to :  Alexithymia

An extensive assessment of the medical databases was carried out. Ten studies reported that alexithymia prevalence was about double in Parkinson's Disease. In previous studies about 20% to 50% of people with Parkinson's Disease have alexithymia, which is about 2 to 4 times normal. Specific dimensions of alexithymia might be related to depression, anxiety, apathy and impulsivity. Two studies on neurological features reported a link between alexithymia and the stage of Parkinsons' Disease. The remaining studies found that alexithymia was independent from neurological symptoms and dopaminergic therapy.

There is a strong association between alexithymia and the severity of depression, which appears to be the primary cause. The results suggest that alexithymia is a primary characteristic of Parkinson's Disease that is often related to depression.

Reference : Parkinsonism and Related Disorders [2016] Mar 30 [Epub ahead of print] (F.Assogna, L.Cravello, M.D.Orfei, N.Cellupica, C.Caltagirone, G.Spalletta) Complete abstract In order to refer to this article on its own click here

 

11th April 2016 - New research

ADAPTIVE DEEP BRAIN STIMULATION FOR PARKINSON'S DISEASE

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Conventional Deep Brain Stimulation is set by a movement disorders specialist and left running continuously without change until the next clinic visit. However, this continuous high voltage stimulation may interfere with normal functioning. In contrast, Adaptive deep brain stimulation (aDBS) has the potential to greatly improve the treatment of Parkinson's disease by optimizing deep brain stimulation in real time according to fluctuating disease and medication state. For more information go to :  Adaptive Deep Brain Stimulation

An external portable aDBS system prototype was developed that was designed for clinical testing in people with Parkinson's Disease who had externalised DBS electrodes. The aDBS system was validated by testing both its sensing and stimulation capabilities, and then by testing it in vivo, focusing on the sensing capabilities. By applying the aDBS system prototype in a patient with Parkinson's Disease, evidence was provided that it can track L-dopa and DBS-induced LFP spectral power changes among different patient's clinical states.

Compared to conventional deep brain stimulation (DBS) for people with Parkinson's Disease (PD), the newer approach of adaptive DBS (aDBS), regulating stimulation on the basis of the patient's clinical state, promises to achieve better clinical outcomes, avoid adverse-effects and save time for tuning parameters.

References : Medical Engineering and Physics [2016] [Epub ahead of print] (M.Arlotti, L.Rossi, M.Rosa, S.Marceglia, A.Priori) Complete abstract In order to refer to this article on its own click here

 

6th April 2016 - New research

THE EMOTIONAL EFFECTS OF DBS ON PARKINSON'S DISEASE

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Researchers assessed the effect of Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) on anxiety, depression and psychosis. Deep Brain Stimulation involves the use of electrodes that are implanted into the brain and connected to a small electrical device that can be externally programmed. DBS can reduce the need for L-dopa and related drugs, which in turn decreases the dyskinesias that are a common side effect of L-dopa. DBS helps to alleviate fluctuations of symptoms and reduce tremors, slowness of movements, and gait problems. DBS requires careful programming of the stimulator device. For more information go to : Deep Brain Stimulation

Improvement of depression and anxiety was apparent after DBS, and was more pronounced in the short-term, an effect that seems to decline in later assessments. Concerning depression, DBS was more effective than medical treatment. However, with anxiety, medical treatments were found to be more effective than DBS. The pattern and course of depression and anxiety following DBS is not clear, although both seem to improve in the short-term. The risk of psychosis remains fairly constant throughout the first five years after DBS implantation.

Results suggest that most psychoses occurring postoperatively are independent of DBS implantation and stimulation settings.

References : Acta Medica Portuguesa [2014] 27 (3) : 372-382 (M.I.Couto, A.Monteiro, A.Oliveira, N.Lunet, J.Massano) Complete abstract Neurosurgical Focus [2015] 38 (6) : E5 (A.A.Qureshi, J.J.Cheng, A.N.Sunshine, A.Wu, G.M.Pontone, N.Cascella, F.A.Lenz, S.E.Grill, W.S.Anderson) Complete abstract   In order to refer to this article on its own click here

 

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