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APRIL 2015

 

30th April 2015 - New research

NEW GENETIC CAUSE OF PARKINSON'S DISEASE

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A new genetic cause of Parkinson's Disease has been discovered called CHCHD2. CHCHD2 is associated with the development of Parkinson's Disease. Most genetic causes of Parkinson's Disease do not inevitably cause Parkinson's Disease but make the person affected more likely to develop Parkinson's Disease.

The full name of the genetic cause is : Coiled-coil-helix-coiled-coil- helixdomain containing 2. The gene is on the Chromosome 7p11.2. The function of the gene is to mediate oxygen-dependent expression of cytochrome c oxidase subunit 4-2 gene expression. The researchers do not know how this function inclines somebody towards Parkinson's Disease. The type of inheritance is autosomal dominant, which means that if the abnormal gene is inherited from only one parent you can get the disease. Often, one of the parents may also have the disease. This gene is associated with an increased likelihood of Parkinsons' Disease.

There are now at least 32 known genetic causes of Parkinson's Disease : PARK 1 to 3, PARK 4 to 20, Tyrosine Hydroxylase deficiency, Aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency, CHCHD2, CYP2D6, DRD2. DRD3, GLIS1, LINGO1, MAPT, NRA42, PITX3, RIT2, STH. Details of individual genes can freely accessed at the  NCBI database

Reference : The Lancet Neurology [2015] 14 (3) : 274-282 (M.Funayama, K.Ohe, T.Amo, N.Furuya, J.Yamaguchi, S.Saiki, Y.Li, K.Ogaki, M.Ando, H.Yoshino, H.Tomiyama, K.Nishioka, K.Hasegawa, H.Saiki, W.Satake, K.Mogushi, R.Sasaki, Y.Kokubo, S.Kuzuhara, T.Toda, Y.Mizuno, Y.Uchiyama, K.Ohno, N.Hattori) Complete abstract  In order to refer to this article on its own click here

 

29th April 2015 - News release

BASEBALL LEGEND DIAGNOSED WITH PARKINSON'S DISEASE

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Kirk Gibson, the former American baseball player and manager, now aged 57, has been diagnosed with Parkinson's Disease. As a player he won two Baseball World Series.

He said "I have faced many different obstacles in my life, and have always maintained a strong belief that no matter the circumstances, I could overcome those obstacles. While this diagnosis poses a new kind of challenge for me, I intend to stay true to my beliefs. With the support of my family and friends, I will meet this challenge with the same determination and unwavering intensity that I have displayed in all of my endeavors in life. I look forward to being back at the ballpark as soon as possible." For more information go to News release

Kirk Gibson (born in 1957) was drafted by both the Detroit Tigers baseball team and the St. Louis Cardinals (Arizona Cardinals) football team, but he chose baseball. He played Major League baseball for Detroit Tigers (1979-1987), Los Angeles Dodgers (1988-1990), Kansas City Royals (1991), Pittsburgh Pirates (1992), Detroit Tigers (1993–1995). He won the Baseball World Series twice, with the Detroit Tigers in 1984, and the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1988. In the 1988 World Series, despite being injured, he hit a game winning home run. He was subsequently a coach for Detroit Tigers (2003-2005), Arizona Diamondbacks (2007-2010), and a manager for Arizona Diamondbacks (2010-2014) after which he retired from baseball. For more information go to : Kirk Gibson In order to refer to this article on its own click here

 

9th April 2015 - New research

NOCTURIA IN PARKINSON'S DISEASE

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Nocturia (often waking at night to urinate) is a frequent complaint in Parkinson's Disease. Researchers aimed to assess the mechanism of nocturia in people with Parkinson's Disease by determining the prevalence of nocturnal polyuria in Parkinson's Disease. Nocturnal polyuria is an increase in urine production in the night but with a decrease in daytime urine production. For more information go to Nocturia

Nocturia was defined as one or more awakenings at night to urinate. Two definitions of nocturnal polyuria were used : NUV33 (33% or more of total urination occurs at night), and NUP90 (nighttime urination exceeds 90ml per hour or more. The prevalence of nocturnal polyuria was 64% according to the NUV33 definition, and 17% according to the NUP90 definition. Among those people with nocturia the prevalence of nocturnal polyuria was 66% according to the NUV33 definition and 21% according to the NUP90 definition. The duration of Parkinson's Disease did not increase the likelihood of nocturia or nocturnal polyuria. However, those people who had Parkinson's Disease who were 70 years old and older were more likely to have both - 72% instead of 55% for those younger than 70. Men had nocturia more frequently - 33% for men and 20% for women.

The prevalence of nocturnal polyuria and nocturia was not higher than in the general population of the same age. This suggests that they occur, not as was thought, because of Parkinson's Disease, but because of the older age that is usually associated with Parkinson's Disease.

Reference : Progres en Urologie [2015] Apr 2 [Epub ahead of print] (J.Romain, F.Torny, J.P. Dumas, X.Gamé, A.Descazeaud) Complete abstract  In order to refer to this article on its own click here

 

3rd April 2015 - New research

MONITORING PARKINSON'S DISEASE USING SMARTPHONES

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Smartphones have been assessed for their use in monitoring Parkinson's Disease. A smartphone (smart phone) is a mobile phone with an advanced mobile operating system. For more information go to Smartphone
                                                                                                                                                                      Participants were provided with smartphones with an Android operating system containing a smartphone application that assessed voice, posture, gait, finger tapping, and response time. They underwent in-clinic assessments, including the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), which is the most used Parkinson's Disease symptom questionnaire.

Participants then took the smart phones home to perform the five tasks four times a day for a month. Once a week they had a remote visit with a Parkinson's Disease specialist in which a modified (excluding assessments of rigidity and balance) UPDRS was performed. The analyses of the five tasks differed between those people with Parkinson Disease and those people who did not have Parkinson's Disease. There was a high degree of accuracy. In discriminating participants with Parkinson's Disease the mean sensitivity was 96% and the mean specificity was 96%.

Measuring Parkinson's Disease symptoms via a smartphone is highly accurate in distinguishing people with Parkinson's Disease. The researchers conclude that it is therefore feasible and has potential value as a diagnostic support tool.

Reference : Parkinsonism Related Disorders [2015] Mar 7 [Epub ahead of print] (S.Arora, V.Venkataraman, A.Hang, S.Donohue, K.M.Biglan, E.R.Dorsey, M.A.Little) Complete abstract  In order to refer to this article on its own click here

 

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