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FEBRUARY 2015

 

26th February 2015 - New books

ENCYCLOPEDIA OF PARKINSON'S DISEASE (8 volumes)

Kate White

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Encyclopedia of Parkinson's Disease is an 8 volume series of encyclopedias covering all different aspects of Parkinson's Disease including : etiology, pathphysiology, clinical aspects, diagnosis, rehabilitation, models and modules, therapeutics, novel treatments, advanced therapies. It is certainly the most extensive encyclopedia of Parkinson's Disease.

Volume I (Etiology and Pathophysiology)  Click here for more details
Volume II (Pathophysiology and Clinical Aspects)   Click here for more details
Volume III (Diagnosis)   Click here for more details
Volume IV (Rehabilitation)   Click here for more details
Volume V (Models and Modules)   Click here for more details
Volume VI (Therapeutics)   Click here for more details
Volume VII (Novel Treatments)   Click here for more details
Volume VIII (Advanced Therapiess)   Click here for more details

For more books concerning Parkinson's Disease go to Parkinson's Disease books In order to refer to this article on its own click here

 

23rd February 2015 - New research

EFFECT OF RESISTANCE TRAINING ON PARKINSON'S DISEASE

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Resistance training is any exercise that causes the muscles to contract against an external resistance with the expectation of increases in strength, tone, mass, and/or endurance. The external resistance can be weights, dumbbells, your own body weight, or any other objects that are heavy enough to cause the muscles to contract. For more information go to : Resistance training

Seven electronic databases were systematically searched for studies from 1946 to 2014 for the effect of resistance training on Parkinson's Disease. Seven studies, comprising of 401 participants with early to advanced Parkinson's Disease were included. The analyses demonstrated significant effects (from a possible range of effect from -1.00 to +1.00) in favour of resistance training compared to non-resistance training or no training at all for : muscle strength (+0.61), parkinsonian motor symptoms (+0.48), and balance (+0.36). There was no significant effect on : gait, balance confidence and quality of life.

This review demonstrated that moderate intensity progressive resistance training, 2 to 3 times per week over 8 to 10 weeks, can result in significant strength, balance and motor symptom gains in people with early to moderate Parkinson's Disease.

Reference : Clinical Rehabilitation [2015] Feb 17 [Epub ahead of print] (C.L.Chung, S. Thilarajah, D.Tan) Complete abstract  In order to refer to this article on its own click here

 

19th February 2015 - New research

EFFECTS OF TRANSCRANIAL MAGNETIC STIMULATION ON PARKINSON'S DISEASE

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Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a non-invasive technique that relies on electromagnetic induction using an insulated coil placed over the scalp. The coil generates brief magnetic pulses, which pass easily and painlessly through the skull into the brain. When pulses are administered in rapid succession, it is referred to as "repetitive TMS" or "rTMS", which can produce longer lasting changes in brain activity. For more information go to : Transcranial magnetic stimulation  However, results evaluating the effectiveness of rTMS in Parkinson's Disease are mixed. So an assessment was made of all studies concerning the use of rTMS in Parkinson's Disease.

Twenty studies with a total of 470 patients were included in the assessment of the efficacy of rTMS. The overall average effect of rTMS showed a significant reduction in motor symptoms. Analysis showed that the size of the effects estimated from high-frequency rTMS targeting the primary motor cortex and low-frequency rTMS applied over other frontal regions were significant. A greater number of pulses per session or across sessions was associated with larger rTMS effects. rTMS has been shown to be well tolerated. The pooled evidence therefore suggests that rTMS improves motor symptoms of people with Parkinson's Disease. Combinations of rTMS site and frequency as well as the number of rTMS pulses are key modulators of rTMS effects.

Reference : JAMA Neurology [2015] Feb 16 [Epub ahead of print] (Y.H.Chou, P.T.Hickey, M.Sundman, A.W.Song, N.K.Chen) Complete abstract  In order to refer to this article on its own click here

 

18th February 2015 - New book

PARKINSON'S DISEASE (DISEASES AND DISORDERS)

Lizabeth Craig

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Publisher's description : This title in Lucent's Diseases and Disorders series focuses on Parkinson's Disease. The book describes how the disease is contracted, its symptoms, and treatments. It also discusses the issues that caregivers face. These books offer readers a means of understanding various ailments; clear, careful explanations offer insight into what these conditions are, what causes them, how we cope with them, and the latest information about treatment and prevention. All volumes in the series include primary and secondary quotations, annotated bibliographies, detailed indexes, and lists of organizations to contact for additional information Click here for more details For more books concerning Parkinson's Disease go to Parkinson's Disease books In order to refer to this article on its own click here

 

14th February 2015 - New research

ELTOPRAZINE REDUCES DYSKINESIA IN PARKINSON'S DISEASE

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Eltoprazine has been found to reduce L-dopa induced dyskinesias in Parkinson's Disease. Eltoprazine is a 5HT partial agonist being developed by Amarantus for the treatment of L-dopa induced dyskinesias in Parkinson's Disease, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Cognition. Simultaneous activation of 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B receptors effectively blocked L-dopa induced dyskinesias in animal models, thereby suggesting its use in humans. For more information go to : Eltoprazine  

A clinical trial was conducted using 2.5mg, 5.0mg and 7.5 mg eltoprazine in combination with Sinemet in people with Parkinson's Disease who had L-dopa induced dyskinesias. They found that 5mg eltoprazine caused a significant reduction of L-dopa induced dyskinesias, and that there was also an antidyskinetic effect with 7.5 mg eltoprazine. Parkinson's Disease symptoms scores did not otherwise alter. The most frequent adverse effects after eltoprazine use were nausea and dizziness. It was concluded that a single dose of eltoprazine has beneficial antidyskinetic effects without altering normal motor responses to L-dopa. All doses of eltoprazine were well tolerated, with no major adverse effects.

Reference : Brain [2015] Feb 10 [Epub ahead of print] (P.Svenningsson, C.Rosenblad, K.Af Edholm Arvidsson, K.Wictorin, C.Keywood, B.Shankar, D.A.Lowe, A.Björklund, H. Widner)  Complete abstract  In order to refer to this article on its own click here

 

11th February 2015 - New research

APDM MOBILITY LAB FOR PARKINSON'S DISEASE ASSESSMENT

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The diagnosis and estimation of disease severity in Parkinson's Disease was assessed using the APDM Mobility Lab. The APDM Mobility Lab uses wearable sensors and sophisticated signal processing to track even subtle changes in gait, stride, balance, rotation, and efficiency and range of movement in upper and lower limbs and torsos. Sensors are simply strapped on to the subject on various parts of the body, including the chest, waist, wrists and ankles. Subjects then perform a test after which a report is generated. For more information go to : APDM Mobility Lab  

Each person performed iTUG (instrumented Timed-Up-and-Go) and iSway (instrumented Sway) using the APDM Mobility Lab. They were assessed according to a range of Parkinson's Disease scores. iTUG and iSway variables differentiated people with Parkinson's Disease from people who did not have Parkinson's Disease. They correlated with all Parkinson's Disease severity measures. Objective scores correlated more strongly with iTUG than iSway.

The study identified sets of iTUG and iSway variables that correlate with Parkinson's Disease severity measures and differentiate people with Parkinson's Disease. The authors suggest that these gait and balance measures could therefore potentially serve as markers of Parkinson's Disease progression. They are consequently under evaluation for this purpose in the ongoing NIH Parkinson Disease Biomarker Program.

Reference : Journal of Neurological Science [2014] 345 (1-2) : 131-138 (D.C.Dewey, S. Miocinovic, I.Bernstein, P.Khemani, R.B.Dewey, R.Querry, S.Chitnis, R.B.Dewey Jr)  Complete abstract  In order to refer to this article on its own click here

 

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