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JANUARY 2017

 

26th January 2017 - New research

MILD COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT IN PARKINSON'S DISEASE

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Researchers have examined the incidence, progression, and reversion of mild cognitive impairment in people with Parkinson's Disease (PD-MCI). Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is an intermediate stage between the cognitive decline of normal ageing and the more-serious decline of dementia. It can involve problems with memory (such as forgetting recent events or repeating the same question), language, thinking, and judgement. For more information go to dementia : Dementia

People with Parkinson's Disease were assessed at diagnosis, after 1 year, after 3 years, and after 5 years. At the outset, 20% of them had PD-MCI, after 1 year 30%, after 3 years 43%, and after 5 years almost half of them (49). Few of those people (7%) who did not have mild cognitive impairment at the outset developed dementia within the next 5 years. Of those that did have mild cognitive impairment at the outset, 39% of them developed dementia within 5 years. Of those that had mild cognitive impairment after 1 year, 59% of them developed dementia within 5 years.

Over 27% of those people with PD-MCI at the outset actually rid their cognitive impairment after 5 years, as did 24% of people who had developed cognitive impairment during the first 5 years. However, they were still far more prone to eventually developing dementia. Although dementia often occurs as Parkinson's Disease worsens, Parkinson's Disease and dementia are biochemically distinct. Dementia is not actually a dopaminergic symptom.

Reference : Neurology [2017] Jan 20 [Epub ahead of print] (K.F.Pedersen, J.P.Larsen, O.B. Tysnes, G.Alves) Complete abstract  In order to refer to this article on its own click here

 

21st January 2017 - New research

SQUALAMINE FOR ALPHA-SYNUCLEIN IN PARKINSON'S DISEASE

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Accumulation of alpha-synuclein is associated with Parkinson's Disease and related syndromes. Squalamine was discovered in the tissues of the dogfish shark. For more information go to sqalamine :  For more information go to : Squalamine

Squalamine, which is a natural product with known anticancer and antiviral activity, has been found to dramatically affect the aggregation of alpha-synuclein. Researchers assessed the mechanism of action of squalamine by investigating its interaction with lipid vesicles, and found that sqalamine displaces alpha- synuclein from the surfaces of lipid vesicles, thereby blocking the first steps in its aggregation. Squalamine almost completely suppresses the toxicity of alpha-synuclein by inhibiting their interactions with lipid membranes.

Researchers suggest that squalamine could therefore be a means of treating Parkinson's Disease, which is associated with alpha-synuclein.

When L-dopa is formed insufficiently, iron accumulation can occur. Iron accumulation increases the aggregation of alpha-synuclein. Superoxide anion can also be produced. Superoxide anion is broken down to hydrogen peroxide, which can also increase the aggregation of alpha-synuclein. So it is Parkinson's Disease, due to insufficient formation of L-dopa, that causes the aggregation of alpha-synuclein, not alpha-synuclein that causes Parkinson's Disease.

Reference : Proceedings, National Academy of Sciences, USA [2017] Jan 17 [Epub ahead of print] (M.Perni, C.Galvagnion, A.Maltsev, G.Meisl, M.B.Müller, P.K.Challa, J.B. Kirkegaard, P.Flagmeier, S.I.Cohen, R.Cascella, S.W.Chen, R.Limboker, P.Sormanni, et al) Complete abstract  In order to refer to this article on its own click here

 

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