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JANUARY 2011

                                                                                                                                                     

29th January 2011 - New review

THE AGE OF DIAGNOSIS IN PARKINSON'S DISEASE

In 1875, Henri Huchard (1844-1911) detailed the first case of Juvenile Parkinson's Disease. He described a 3 year old child who had all the clinical features of Parkinson's Disease. The youngest reported case of Parkinson's Disease is that of a 10 year old girl from Okalahoma, who showed her first symptoms of Parkinson's Disease at only 2 years old. However, it is very uncommon for people under the age of 30 to develop Parkinson's Disease. The likelihood of developing Parkinson's Disease becomes increasingly more common with age [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6].

The average age at which symptoms usually begin differs from county to country, most typically in the late fifties, with the latest average onset being in Sweden 65.6 [7], and Estonia 66.9 [8]. The likelihood of Parkinson's Disease increases sharply at the age of 60, and peaks in those aged 85 to 89 years old [9]. However, the likelihood of developing Parkinson's Disease actually starts to decline at 90 years of age [9], and reduces even further after that. Parkinson's Disease is rare amongst the very old - those people over 100 [10], and even more so in those people who are 110 to 119 years old [11]. So despite Parkinson's Disease usually being assumed to be a medical disorder of older age, it is possible for a 2 year old to have Parkinson's Disease, and for a 119 year old to not have Parkinson's Disease. In order to refer to this article on its own click here.

 

16th January 2011 - New research

AMANTADINE FOR DYSKINESIAS IN PARKINSON'S DISEASE

BasedPLoS One [2010] 5 (12) : e15298 (Sawada H, Oeda T, Kuno S, Nomoto M, Yamamoto K, Yamamoto M, Hisanaga K, Kawamura T) Complete abstract

The purpose of the present study was to investigate the efficacy of Amantadine in people with Parkinson's Disease suffering from dyskinesias. Dyskinesias, which are involuntary movements, are some of the major complications that impair quality of life for some people with Parkinson's disease. They are normally caused by an excess of dopaminergic drugs, such as L-dopa in its various forms, and dopamine agonists. For more information go to Dyskinesia in Parkinson's Disease. A controlled clinical trial was carried out using
300mg per day of Amantadine, which is also marketed as Symmetrel. For more information go to Symmetrel. Using the Rush Dyskinesia Rating Scale (RDRS), 64% of those people taking Amantadine improved, whereas only 16% of those people taking the placebo improved. Some Parkinson's Disease symptoms improved, but others did not. Results from the present study demonstrated that Amantadine exhibited beneficial effects against dyskinesias in 60% to 70% of people with Parkinson's Disease. However, the study did not indicate the side effects caused as a result of taking Amantadine. In order to refer to this article on its own click here.

 

13th January 2011 - New research

THE PREVALENCE OF EYE DISORDERS IN PARKINSON'S DISEASE

Klinica Oczna [2010] 112 (7-9) : 247-252 (Nowacka B, Lubinski W, Karczewicz D.) Complete abstract

Based on the available medical literature, the authors described the most frequent ocular diseases (eye disorders) and symptoms, as well as bioelectrical dysfunction of the visual pathway in patients with Parkinson's Disease. The most frequent eye disorders in Parkinson's Disease were found to be dry eye syndrome and glaucoma. In Dry Eye Syndrome, the lack of moistness in the eyes can cause eyes to become dry, itchy, red, gritty, or blurred. For more
information go to Dry Eye Syndrome. In Glaucoma, the optic nerve fibers become damaged. Small blind spots can occur, and can develop in to significant loss of vision. Most people with glaucoma do not notice the symptoms until they have significant loss of vision. For more information go to Glaucoma. A quarter of people with Parkinson's Disease have visual hallucinations. The visual hallucinations are usually due to an excess of dopaminergic drugs such as L-dopa in its various forms, or dopamine agonists. Visual hallucinations are not normally due to a problem with the structure of the eyes. For more information go to Hallucinations in Parkinson's Disease. In order to refer to this article on its own click here.

 

3rd January 2011 - New book

PUT ON YOUR PARKY FACE

Bill Schmalfeldt

Publisher's description : Bill Schmalfeldt is serving notice. It's time for Parkinson's disease patients to stop being invisible. It's time for a nationwide effort to raise awareness about a crippling degenerative neurological disorder and the havoc it wreaks on American families. Having had PD himself since 2000 at age 45, Bill volunteered for experimental brain surgery in 2007. He spins a humorous, poignant, sometimes angry tale about his life with this incurable progressive neurological condition. 100% of the author proceeds from this book will be donated to Parkinson's research charities. This book should be owned by anyone who has Parkinson's, or knows someone with PD, or anyone who might GET Parkinson's someday - in other words...YOU!  Click here for more details. For more books concerning Parkinson's Disease go to Parkinson's Disease Books.

 

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